Full Speed Power Play Passing Sequence



Full Speed Power Play Passing Sequence

I use the Full Speed Power Play Passing Sequence to simulate the patterns and passing lanes players will see in game situations. The idea for this drill is to instill the mindset of “Set-up, Attack, Rebound, then back to Set-up.” All executed at top speed. Here’s the diagram and explanation:

Full Speed Power Play Passing Sequence

1. Player’s line up in proper position for your team’s power play set-up (in this case it’s the “hybrid” set-up)
2. Place cones in positions where the opposing defenders will likely be
3. Work through your attack options, in order from highest probability to lowest
4. Focus on running through “set-up, attack, rebound, and back to set-up,” with crisp passes, always executing at full speed

Enjoy!


USE THIS DRILL IN YOUR OWN PRACTICE PLAN:



Forecheck: 2-1-2 Spread/Stack




Two simple variations of a 2-1-2 forecheck

The 2-1-2 forecheck is generally one of the first set-ups young players learn. It is simple to understand, and can be taught at very young age groups. In this video we outline two possible variations of the 2-1-2 that you can choose from based on the other team’s strengths and weaknesses.

The 2-1-2 Stack puts extreme pressure on the puck-carrying defenseman, and makes it virtually impossible to break out up the strong side of the ice. The Spread is used to combat the D to D pass behind the net. In either set-up, our F3 and our two Defensemen need to anticipate and get to the proper position quickly!

Enjoy!

Breakouts: Transition from DZC to Breakout




Transition from Box +1 to Breakout



Transition from Sagging Zone, and Sagging Zone Arrow, to Breakout

Well-designed systems should lead from one objective to the next. For example, your defensive zone coverage set-up should put you in proper position to gain the puck back and initiate a breakout. Your breakout should set you up to enter the neutral zone with proper support, and in a strong offensive attack position. The three DZC systems discussed in this post are very effective because they transition well into breakouts after you get the puck back.

CLICK HERE to watch our video on “Initiating a Hockey Breakout”

Enjoy!