The SportScreen



The SportScreen is an Awesome Product to Save Your Garage

Obviously, I do a lot of hockey training from home. So far, things have been great. My kids are improving (and so am I), and the equipment I’ve been working with is holding up great! However, I had one vulnerability in my set-up. I have a wall in the basement with two windows. If I ring the puck off the post just right, it ricochets off and hits the window (it has already happened a few times).

When I heard about SportScreen, I immediately thought it could be an excellent solution for my window issue… I was right!

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sportscreen installationUnboxing the SportScreen:
When you unbox your SportScreen, I recommend opening the instructions and doing a quick inventory. There are quite a few pieces, so make sure you’re not missing anything.

QUICK TIP: The folks down at SportScreen love to stack pieces inside each other. So if you’re missing anything, check inside all the tubes before calling in your missing piece!

After taking inventory, give a quick read through the instructions, decide the mounting style you’re going to use, then have at it!

Installation Process:
Installing the SportScreen took me about 2 hours. The process is pretty straightforward if you follow the instructions. Here’s what I did:

  1. Assemble the header tube. It comes in three pieces. Stick the pieces together, then secure them with the self-tapping screws
  2. Hang the mounting brackets. This will vary depending on what you’re drilling into. For me, I mounted a 2×4 to my basement wall using a stud gun, then attached the brackets to the wood. It’s holding up great!
  3. Insert the header tube. If you’ve spaced the brackets properly, the header tube will slide right into place. Make sure you use the cotter pin to keep it from working it’s way out.
  4. Attach the screen. Hook the screen to the header tube using the velcro paneling that’s attaches to both the screen and the tube.
  5. Set your height stops. Use the wand tool that comes with your SportScreen to set the ascending stop and the descending stop. This will make it so you never have to manually stop it.
  6. Insert rods. Put the heavy, metal rod in the bottom slot, and the lighter, plastic rod in the slot that’s about half-way up the screen. The rods help it to hang properly, and make it so the pucks hit with a “dead bounce.”
  7. Test remote. The remote usually comes programmed for your SportScreen. If, for some reason, yours isn’t, just plug in the SportScreen, and hold down the up button while you hear the 5 beeps. Now your remote is programmed!
  8. Mount your remote holder somewhere convenient.

Usability & Functionality:
Assembly is the hard part (even thought it’s not that hard). Once you’re set up, using the SportScreen is literally as easy as pushing a button. Lower it down when you need to use it, raise it back up when you’re done!

Functionally the SportScreen does EVERYTHING it claims to do, and protects your house, cars, garage door, and windows from flying pucks! It’s also a great targeting system if you decide to use it that way.

1-2-2 “Foosball” Forecheck: IN ACTION




Here’s a great example of the 1-2-2 “Foosball” Forecheck in action

The 1-2-2 “Foosball” Forecheck can be a great set-up if you have the right type of team for it. This forecheck requires speed and discipline. If you lack either of those attributes, it’ll probably fall apart for you. Here are the main key points on this set-up:

1-2-2 “Foosball” Forecheck

1-2-2_forecheck1. F1 “flushes” outside in, and chases the puck no matter where it goes
2. F2 and F3 set up at about the tops of the circles, slightly narrower than the dots
3. D-men set up the same distance apart as F1 and F2, but they’re at the blue line
4. As the play moves up the boards, the strong-side forward hits the receiver, strong side d-man seals the boards at the blue line
5. Weak-side forward and d-man slide across and protect the middle passing lanes
6. F1 funnels back to provide support

CHECK OUT THE FULL EXPLANATIONS OF THE 1-2-2 “FOOSBALL” FORECHECK HERE:

Enjoy!

6 Ways to Make your Hockey Practices More Effective

The Ice “Crisis:”
It’s no secret that there’s a shortage of ice in a lot of hockey towns. Different organizations have tried to address this problem in different ways… with some outcomes working out better than others. Many organizations run half-ice practices, with two teams sharing the ice. Other programs are running “station practices,” with 50-60 players rotating through various stations. Some programs are still using the “old-fashioned” method of full-ice practices, with one team on the ice at a time. I believe most organizations are using some combination of the scheduling methods above.

The purpose of this article isn’t to critique the various “ice accommodation strategies” that have been tried over the years, nor is it to attempt to solve the world’s ice scheduling issues (although that might be another topic for another day). What I’m looking to accomplish here, is to set forth a philosophy that you can use with your team, regardless of the stance your organization has adopted.

Making Wise Use of Your Ice Sessions:
There are endless philosophies and opinions on how hockey players should be developed, what types of skills should be taught, and at what age the various skills and concepts should be introduced. I have my opinions, and I’m sure you have yours! Regardless of your school of thought, one simple development strategy holds true… teams MUST make the most of their ice time, especially when ice is as scarce and expensive as it is today!

Here are a few tips I recommend:

1. Take it Outside! Lots of stuff can be worked on off the ice, away from the rink. An obvious one is conditioning. It kills me to use precious ice time for skating ladders! If players, coaches, and teams all got on board to consistently execute a well-designed, hockey-specific workout program, both during the off-season and in-season, then conditioning wouldn’t need to be addressed in practice.
Check out our free, 3-Part video series on Off-Ice Training for Hockey.

2. Off-Ice Skills Sessions: Conditioning isn’t the only thing that can be developed away from the rink. Many teams are holding off-ice skills sessions to supplement their on-ice practices. Modern advances in off-ice training aids have made the experience much more realistic for players looking to develop their stickhandling, deking, shooting, passing, and even some aspects of skating. Getting set up to hold off-ice skills sessions takes a bit of financial investment up front, but the return on investment in the long run can be HUGE. Here are some examples of off-ice training sessions we’ve run:




Visit our friends at HockeyShot to start collecting your off-ice training aids.

3. On-Ice-Specific Development: On the flip side, there are some skills that can only be developed on the ice. Skating technique, agility, passing in motion, 1 on 1’s, 2 on 1’s and other battling tactics all fall into this category. Positional play and systems work are also tactics that must be developed on the ice. Stuff that can’t be worked on OFF the ice, should be highly stressed ON the ice!

4. Homework Assignments: Another place a lot of practice time is wasted is at the whiteboard, while drills are being explained. I know a lot of coaches who assign homework before practices. Usually these are web links to video diagrams, animations, or demonstrations of new drills. There may still need to be a quick explanation, but if the player has done his/her homework, there learning curve is significantly reduced.
Many coaches have used the videos in our Coaches’ Training Course as homework for their players.

5. Core Drills: I also recommend having a core set of 10-15 drills you use on a regular basis. Players will begin to memorize these drills, and know them by name. You’ll eventually be able to just call out the drill, and players will get themselves set up without needing the explanation again. This tactic can help keep practices running smoothly, and it also reinforces the concept of perfecting drills and skill sets.

6. Coach’s Preparation: Anyone who knows me, knows I’m a HUGE believer in planning every single practice. Keeping your thoughts organized on the ice is extremely important to running a smooth practice. In my opinion, the best way to keep yourself, and your practice organized is with a computerized diagrammer/practice planner. The two I use (and recommend) are DrillDraw and HockeyShare. Both are phenomenal!

It doesn’t have to be “either/or…”
Lastly, many coaches and administrators have the mistaken belief that systems play shouldn’t be taught too early, because it detracts from skill development. This can be true if you LET it be true, but I believe it doesn’t have to be an “either/or” proposition. If you make proper use of your team sessions, both on and off the ice, and develop individual and team skills in the proper order, then positional and systems concepts can naturally be built into your practices, even at very young ages!

As players begin to learn the recurring patterns of the game, because of well-structured practice sessions, they will begin to see the play better, and react more quickly when those same patterns present themselves in real games. It can be done, and you’re the one who can do it! Check out our playbook for more information on developing systems hockey at young ages.

What have we missed?
Are there any on-ice productivity tips you’re using that we didn’t mention here? Leave your tips in the comments below!

C-Pass Give and Go Drill



The C-Pass Give and Go is a great, high-tempo passing drill.

The C-Pass Give and Go is an awesome drill to get your players moving. It is high tempo, and works a lot on giving and receiving passes in motion. This drill should be done at full speed. As your players get the hang of this drill, start pushing them to keep their feet moving throughout the entire drill. Here’s the diagram:

c-pass_give_and_goC-Pass Give and Go
1. First player in each line leaves without a puck, skates the “C,” then receives a pass from the next player in line at about the top of the circle.
2. After receiving the pass, the puck carrier skates into the neutral zone and executes a give and go pass with (P).
3. After picking up the return pass, the puck carrier steps into the high slot and lets a shot go.

Enjoy!


USE THIS DRILL IN YOUR OWN PRACTICE PLAN:



The S3 Formula for Off-ice Training

Write up from http://coachchic.com

Hmmmmmmmmm…  My good friend and fellow hockey coach, Jeremy Weiss, just let me in on his new S3 Formula training program, and I think it’s definitely worth sharing with you.

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If you have a chance to watch the following hockey training video, you’ll see how you might gain a HUGE advantage over your opponent!  And, in keeping with the CoachChic.com way of doing things, 

it’s all about the science of training

!

Actually, a lot of the information you’ll find in the S3 Formula is scattered within our site.  However, Jeremy has gathered the best advice you can find on off-ice training all in one place.

So, go ahead…  Take a look (the video contains really good stuff — and you’re going to learn some pretty valuable background information about training for hockey, even if you’re not inclined buy)…

Click here to visit Jeremy Weiss.

Posted via email from Jeremy Weiss’ Posterous

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