The SportScreen



The SportScreen is an Awesome Product to Save Your Garage

Obviously, I do a lot of hockey training from home. So far, things have been great. My kids are improving (and so am I), and the equipment I’ve been working with is holding up great! However, I had one vulnerability in my set-up. I have a wall in the basement with two windows. If I ring the puck off the post just right, it ricochets off and hits the window (it has already happened a few times).

When I heard about SportScreen, I immediately thought it could be an excellent solution for my window issue… I was right!

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sportscreen installationUnboxing the SportScreen:
When you unbox your SportScreen, I recommend opening the instructions and doing a quick inventory. There are quite a few pieces, so make sure you’re not missing anything.

QUICK TIP: The folks down at SportScreen love to stack pieces inside each other. So if you’re missing anything, check inside all the tubes before calling in your missing piece!

After taking inventory, give a quick read through the instructions, decide the mounting style you’re going to use, then have at it!

Installation Process:
Installing the SportScreen took me about 2 hours. The process is pretty straightforward if you follow the instructions. Here’s what I did:

  1. Assemble the header tube. It comes in three pieces. Stick the pieces together, then secure them with the self-tapping screws
  2. Hang the mounting brackets. This will vary depending on what you’re drilling into. For me, I mounted a 2×4 to my basement wall using a stud gun, then attached the brackets to the wood. It’s holding up great!
  3. Insert the header tube. If you’ve spaced the brackets properly, the header tube will slide right into place. Make sure you use the cotter pin to keep it from working it’s way out.
  4. Attach the screen. Hook the screen to the header tube using the velcro paneling that’s attaches to both the screen and the tube.
  5. Set your height stops. Use the wand tool that comes with your SportScreen to set the ascending stop and the descending stop. This will make it so you never have to manually stop it.
  6. Insert rods. Put the heavy, metal rod in the bottom slot, and the lighter, plastic rod in the slot that’s about half-way up the screen. The rods help it to hang properly, and make it so the pucks hit with a “dead bounce.”
  7. Test remote. The remote usually comes programmed for your SportScreen. If, for some reason, yours isn’t, just plug in the SportScreen, and hold down the up button while you hear the 5 beeps. Now your remote is programmed!
  8. Mount your remote holder somewhere convenient.

Usability & Functionality:
Assembly is the hard part (even thought it’s not that hard). Once you’re set up, using the SportScreen is literally as easy as pushing a button. Lower it down when you need to use it, raise it back up when you’re done!

Functionally the SportScreen does EVERYTHING it claims to do, and protects your house, cars, garage door, and windows from flying pucks! It’s also a great targeting system if you decide to use it that way.

Weiss Tech Hockey Reveals its Top 5 Most Popular Posts of All Time

I started this blog a little over 4 years ago… which is a long time in internet years! It started as a bit of an experiment for me. I wanted to try and use web technology to help local coaches with their practice plans. I’d been playing around with a “new” drill diagrammer I had just come across, DrillDraw, and thought it would be cool to make video explanations of drills using a “digital whiteboard.”

I started by posting a few video explanations of my favorite drills, and things just kinda took off from there! At that time, nobody was doing digital video explanations, and it seemed to be a method of delivery that resonated with coaches. As things have progressed, we’ve branched out into other aspects of hockey training and development, and the blog has developed into the format you see today.

This week I was doing a bit of reflection, and I got curious as to which of my posts have been the most popular (in terms of page views) over the past 4 years. So I decided to look into it, and post Weiss Tech Hockey’s Top 5 Most Popular Posts. Here they are (remember, my video-production abilities have evolved over the years… so you might get a good laugh at some of my older stuff!):

Weiss Tech Hockey’s Top 5 Most Popular Posts of All Time

5. Breakouts: Color-coded Breakout System
4. Breakout Progression Drill
3. Forecheck: 1-2-2 “Foosball” Forecheck
2. My Favorite Off-Ice Agility Drill

And the Number 1 Weiss Tech Hockey Post of All Time…

1. 9 Half-Ice Hockey Drills Every Coach Should Know

HELP US OUT!
So there’s the Top 5. I’d love to know which Weiss Tech content has been the most useful for you. Leave your comments in the section below, and let us know what has been useful, and what you’d like to see more of.

Thanks for your participation!

Jeremy

Hockey Plus Minus App for iPad



This Hockey Plus Minus App for iPad is a Fast and Easy Way to Track Plus Minus During Games!

Anybody who follows my blog knows I’m a huge believer in using technology to enhance hockey coaching. I recently came across an iPad app that I’m really excited about… it’s called Hockey Plus Minus.

If you check out the app store, you’ll see there are a number of hockey stat apps that have begun cropping up, some are really complex with the ability to track tons of different stuff, some are extremely simple, and only track a few things. With all the different options out there, I figured I’d take the chance to throw in my 2 cents worth on the subject.

Here are three questions you should ask yourself before picking a mobile stat tracker:

What do you want to track?

You can get REALLY in depth with your stat tracking, or you can stay pretty basic. Higher level teams need a lot more depth in their tracking (hits, faceoffs won, shots on goal and shot locations, etc.), younger teams don’t need to dedicate as much time and effort into stat tracking––in my opinion.

What is already being tracked?

Obviously, an app that tracks goals and assists will be redundant, since that’s already being tracked on the game sheet. Some leagues require the score keepers to track shots on goal as well. I don’t care about wasting time and effort tracking things that are already being tracked.

Who will be tracking the stats?

If you, as the coach, are planning on tracking the stats yourself from the bench, you’ll need an interface that is clean and simple, that requires little time to input each event. This is the main reason I love this Hockey Plus Minus app. The interface is simple, and I can enter in the info quickly, with minimal effort.

Conclusion:

As a coach, Plus Minus is the main stat I prefer to keep control of. The real strength of Plus Minus is what it shows over the course of a season, so if it is inconsistently tracked, its useless and might as well not be tracked at all. This app makes it really easy to track it consistently.

There are a few suggestions I’d make to the developers of this app as they roll new versions out:

  1. add the ability to view, select, and edit by individual goal (if you made a mistake and need to change it)
  2. add the ability to see the score
  3. add the ability to export a report into an excel doc

Hope this app comes in handy for you,

Cheers!

Jeremy

Spice Figure 8 Passing Drill



Here’s Another One of my Favorite Hockey Passing Drills

I love this hockey passing drill because it just flows well––especially when you have the right group of players for it. At it’s best, this is a quick-paced, “tic-tac-toe” type of drill. However, if you have the wrong group of players, this drill will grind to a halt pretty quickly. So, just make sure your players are advanced enough before attempting this one! Here’s the diagram and explanation:

spice_fig_8_passingSpice Figure 8 Passing Drill
1. On the whistle, one (F) from each line diagonally across from each other goes.
2. Each (F) takes a few steps forward, then passes to the far (D).
3. The defensemen make a few “D to D” passes, then hit the (F) as he power turns around the far cone.
4. After skating the figure 8 as shown in the diagram, (F) picks up the puck, splits the defensemen, and enters the zone for a shot on net.

Enjoy!!


USE THIS DRILL IN YOUR OWN PRACTICE PLAN:



Window Drill



The Window Drill is one of my staples for working on hockey crossovers with youngsters

I love the Window Drill for a few reasons: It’s easy to set up, easy to execute, you can run it half ice, and it’s extremely effective for working on hockey crossovers!

As you run this drill with your team, make sure you emphasize that the players MUST keep their feet moving throughout the entire “window.” Also, teach them to use puck protection tactics as they execute their crossovers.

window_drillWindow Drill

1. On whistle, first player from each line explodes full speed to the blue line
2. At the blue line, players enters into the “window” zone – and maintains crossovers through the entire window
3. After exiting window, player shoots with head up and feet moving

Enjoy!!


USE THIS DRILL IN YOUR OWN PRACTICE PLAN:



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