Post-Up Regroup in Action


Post-Up Regroup in Action

Hey… this systems stuff actually works! We talk a lot of theory here on the blog, but I also like to show what our systems look like in action from time to time, and the Leafs had a text-book execution of our Post-Up Regroup, which led to a goal by Kadri. Let’s take a look at some of the key points of the Post-Up Regroup:

post-up_regroupPost-Up Regroup
1. Defensemen pick up the puck in the NZ and drag skate to open ice
2. Both wingers position themselves on the boards at the far blue line for an outlet pass
3. Center reads the puck movement, and provides middle support to whichever winger receives the pass
4. If the opposing Defenseman “bites” on the winger, he can touch pass to the center swinging through
5. Center enters the zone wide, far-side winger drives the net, close winger becomes the trailer

Neutral Zone Trap Clarified


Neutral Zone Trap Clarified

Seems like I’m doing a lot of Q&A work these days! There have been quite a few questions on the Neutral Zone Trap I diagrammed up a few years ago. So I decided to make a quick clarification video to resolve some of these questions. Before we jump straight in, let me just state again that there are many ways of structuring systems. Sometimes these differences are adjustments to what the other team is doing, sometimes they’re just the coach’s personal preference. Either way, use this info if it makes sense for your situation. If not, don’t use it! Here are a few key points to remember:

Neutral Zone Trap Clarification - YouTubeNeutral Zone Trap
1. The trap is a CONCEPT: make it look like the board-side breakout is open, then systematically shut it down
2. There is more than one way this can be done
3. Adjustments should be made depending on how high the opposing team’s wingers are, and where the breakout is initiating from
4. Ability to angle will make or break the trap – funnel the breakout into the “kill zone”
5. Try to shut down the other team’s breakout BEFORE the red line (to eliminate the option for a dump in)
6. Generate offense with quick NZ transitions after the turnover!

Hope this helps!

1-2-2 “Foosball” Forecheck: IN ACTION




Here’s a great example of the 1-2-2 “Foosball” Forecheck in action

The 1-2-2 “Foosball” Forecheck can be a great set-up if you have the right type of team for it. This forecheck requires speed and discipline. If you lack either of those attributes, it’ll probably fall apart for you. Here are the main key points on this set-up:

1-2-2 “Foosball” Forecheck

1-2-2_forecheck1. F1 “flushes” outside in, and chases the puck no matter where it goes
2. F2 and F3 set up at about the tops of the circles, slightly narrower than the dots
3. D-men set up the same distance apart as F1 and F2, but they’re at the blue line
4. As the play moves up the boards, the strong-side forward hits the receiver, strong side d-man seals the boards at the blue line
5. Weak-side forward and d-man slide across and protect the middle passing lanes
6. F1 funnels back to provide support

CHECK OUT THE FULL EXPLANATIONS OF THE 1-2-2 “FOOSBALL” FORECHECK HERE:

Enjoy!

5-Card Skating Drill



5-Card Skating Drill

5-Card Skating is a great drill my assistant coach, Ryan Newton, came up with. I like this one because it lets you work on the defensive zone coverage skating patterns while getting some conditioning in. Here’s the diagram:

5-Card Skating Drill

1. Players start in 5-card formation
2. On whistle, each position skates full speed out to his or her designated attack area, pivots, then skates backward into 5-card position
3. Sequence follows, position by position. Center covers for the corner positions until they get back, and takes the seam (attack areas 2 and 5)
4. Wingers alternate between attack positions each “lap”
5. Do 4 “laps” then switch out 5-man unit for a new one

Enjoy!


USE THIS DRILL IN YOUR OWN PRACTICE PLAN:



D-Zone Coverage: “Sagging” Zone




The “Sagging” Zone is a more aggressive defensive zone coverage set-up that will cause more turnovers than the less aggressive Box +1

In this video, we walk through the “Sagging” Zone set-up. I really like the risk level of this particular set-up. It is quite aggressive, but by dropping your weak-side winger down into the low slot, you can still maintain great coverage in front of the net.

As players get more comfortable with this system, teach the weak-side winger to anticipate and pick off D to D passes, and cross-ice passes out of the corner. Good, quick wingers will see a lot of breakaways and 2 on 1’s by reading these passes well.

As is the case with the Box +1, “Sagging” Zone Coverage converts very well into a breakout when the transition occurs. The natural positioning for coverage is exactly where the players need to be to initiate the breakout.

Enjoy!

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