Dangle Glove Hockey Stickhandling Aid




The Dangle Glove Encourages Proper Stickhandling Technique by Forcing Players to Use their Top Hand

Every once in a while, a product comes along that just “makes sense.” The Dangle Glove is one of them. This special glove helps to “force” players to use proper technique while stickhandling.

Dangle Glove Overview:
I’m sure at some point you’ve seen players stickhandling using a piece of PVC pipe, or a toilet paper tube on their bottom hand. This old training technique has been around for a long time, and is used to help players develop the habit of using their top hand to control the stickhandle, while their bottom hand acts as a stabilizer. The Dangle Glove takes this training method to a whole new level, allowing for more flexibility in drill types.

Problems with PVC Pipe Method:
Although the old PVC Pipe method is a good start, there are some major limitations to this training method.

  1. You can’t let go of your bottom hand. If you do, the pipe drops to the bottom of the stick, and the device is useless.
  2. You can’t do on-ice, contact drills. Obviously, there’s no padding around a piece of PVC pipe. In theory, you COULD wear your glove, and hold onto the PVC pipe, on the ice… But then you run into the same problem we mentioned above; you can’t let go of the stick without the pipe dropping to the bottom.

The Dangle Glove:
The Dangle Glove fixes the problems with the old, PVC pipe method. Here’s how they’ve done it:

  • Dangle Glove features an HDPE insert that mimics the effect of the PVC pipe, except it’s the shape of a half cylinder. This design lets you let go of the stick, then re-grab it, without losing the insert.
  • Dangle Glove has attached their plastic insert into the palm of the glove (via velcro), which allows players to wear the glove in on-ice, full-contact situations.

Conclusion:
The updated design of the dangle glove let’s players develop their stickhandling skills in a multitude of situations. It’s great for off-ice use, as well as for use on the ice. It’s a fantastic tool, and one that I definitely recommend!


2-1-2 Spread: In Action




How to Execute a Proper 2-1-2 Spread Forecheck

In our last post, we talked about beating a 2-1-2 with a D to D pass. In the footage, we saw the NJ Devils using an aggressive 2-1-2 “Stack” against the Rangers. In this post, we’ll show you the LA Kings using another variation of the 2-1-2, the 2-1-2 “Spread.”

2-1-2 Stack vs Spread
There are two types of 2-1-2 set-ups; the “stack,” where the first two players enter the zone on the same side of the ice, the first player hits and pins, the second player takes the puck; and the “spread,” where the first player attacks the puck carrier, and the second player eliminates the D to D pass (this is what the Kings are using in this clip).

See our video on the 2-1-2 Forecheck here: 2-1-2 Stack & Spread Explanation

2-1-2 “Spread” Explained
The key to an effectice 2-1-2 “Spread” is for F1 (the first forward on the attack) come in aggressive. If F1 is lazy geting in, the play won’t work. F2 must also get in hard and take away the D to D pass. F3 reads F1’s forechecking angle, and takes away the strong side breakout. If done properly, there’s nothing the opposing defenseman can do except try to force a pass up the strong side, or dump it out of the zone.

Strategically…
The 2-1-2 is a great forecheck to set an aggressive tone at the beginning of a game. If your players are in good enough shape, and can execute it consistently, you can stick with it for an entire game. But I recommend having another forecheck to fall back on if the 2-1-2 starts getting sloppy.

Enjoy!

Passing: Extreme Passing Kit




The Extreme Passing Kit is a Great Way to Incorporate Passing into your Off-Ice Workouts

Passing is a skill that most players don’t think about working on away from the rink. The main reason they don’t think to work on passing is pretty obvious: because you need a partner to pass to, and to receive passes from… Unless, of course, you have the Extreme Passing Kit.

Overview:
The Extreme Passing Kit is a really cool skill pad & passing rebounder combo, that will let you work on multiple skills such as regular passes, touch passes, and one-time shots.

The Extreme Passing Kit comes in two different models, the One-Timer Model (which you see in this video), and the Bungee Cord Model. The only difference between the two is that the rebounder is removable in the One-Timer Model, and can be mounted onto another shooting pad, or even your dryland flooring tiles. This feature gives you a little more flexibility than you have with the Bungee Cord Model.

On the Bungee Cord Model, the rebounding bungee is mounted right onto the skill pad, making the unit completely self contained (which has it’s benefits as well, in my opinion).

Both models use the 4×8′ roll-up shooting pad (huge!), which is light weight, durable, and portable. You can easily roll it up for storage when you aren’t using it, or pack it in the car to bring it to a new dryland training location.

My Experience:
The Extreme Passing Kit comes already rolled up for you. When I first unboxed mine, it had retained the shape of being rolled up (which is to be expected), and I had to sort of “pry” it open and “reverse roll” it a bit on the ends to keep it from rolling back up on me. I let it sit out on my driveway in the hot sun for about an hour, and it flattened right out.

Once the shooting pad had flattened out, I mounted the rebounder to one end (it just clamps on), and went to town!

One thing you’ll notice about the Extreme Passing Kit is that it works really well with pretty much any type of puck. I’ve used mine with regular black pucks, FlyPucks, and Green Biscuits, all of which slide really well, and stay flat off the rebounder. In fact, the pucks stayed flat enough that I was actually able to work some one-touch passes as well (which actually surprised me a little).

Conclusion:
In conclusion, the Extreme Passing Kit is definitely a worthwhile product to add to your Home Hockey Training Center. It is well built, versatile, portable, and the surface area of the skill pad is big enough to use it for shooting, stickhandling, or passing.