Post-Up Regroup in Action


Post-Up Regroup in Action

Hey… this systems stuff actually works! We talk a lot of theory here on the blog, but I also like to show what our systems look like in action from time to time, and the Leafs had a text-book execution of our Post-Up Regroup, which led to a goal by Kadri. Let’s take a look at some of the key points of the Post-Up Regroup:

post-up_regroupPost-Up Regroup
1. Defensemen pick up the puck in the NZ and drag skate to open ice
2. Both wingers position themselves on the boards at the far blue line for an outlet pass
3. Center reads the puck movement, and provides middle support to whichever winger receives the pass
4. If the opposing Defenseman “bites” on the winger, he can touch pass to the center swinging through
5. Center enters the zone wide, far-side winger drives the net, close winger becomes the trailer

The SportScreen



The SportScreen is an Awesome Product to Save Your Garage

Obviously, I do a lot of hockey training from home. So far, things have been great. My kids are improving (and so am I), and the equipment I’ve been working with is holding up great! However, I had one vulnerability in my set-up. I have a wall in the basement with two windows. If I ring the puck off the post just right, it ricochets off and hits the window (it has already happened a few times).

When I heard about SportScreen, I immediately thought it could be an excellent solution for my window issue… I was right!

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sportscreen installationUnboxing the SportScreen:
When you unbox your SportScreen, I recommend opening the instructions and doing a quick inventory. There are quite a few pieces, so make sure you’re not missing anything.

QUICK TIP: The folks down at SportScreen love to stack pieces inside each other. So if you’re missing anything, check inside all the tubes before calling in your missing piece!

After taking inventory, give a quick read through the instructions, decide the mounting style you’re going to use, then have at it!

Installation Process:
Installing the SportScreen took me about 2 hours. The process is pretty straightforward if you follow the instructions. Here’s what I did:

  1. Assemble the header tube. It comes in three pieces. Stick the pieces together, then secure them with the self-tapping screws
  2. Hang the mounting brackets. This will vary depending on what you’re drilling into. For me, I mounted a 2×4 to my basement wall using a stud gun, then attached the brackets to the wood. It’s holding up great!
  3. Insert the header tube. If you’ve spaced the brackets properly, the header tube will slide right into place. Make sure you use the cotter pin to keep it from working it’s way out.
  4. Attach the screen. Hook the screen to the header tube using the velcro paneling that’s attaches to both the screen and the tube.
  5. Set your height stops. Use the wand tool that comes with your SportScreen to set the ascending stop and the descending stop. This will make it so you never have to manually stop it.
  6. Insert rods. Put the heavy, metal rod in the bottom slot, and the lighter, plastic rod in the slot that’s about half-way up the screen. The rods help it to hang properly, and make it so the pucks hit with a “dead bounce.”
  7. Test remote. The remote usually comes programmed for your SportScreen. If, for some reason, yours isn’t, just plug in the SportScreen, and hold down the up button while you hear the 5 beeps. Now your remote is programmed!
  8. Mount your remote holder somewhere convenient.

Usability & Functionality:
Assembly is the hard part (even thought it’s not that hard). Once you’re set up, using the SportScreen is literally as easy as pushing a button. Lower it down when you need to use it, raise it back up when you’re done!

Functionally the SportScreen does EVERYTHING it claims to do, and protects your house, cars, garage door, and windows from flying pucks! It’s also a great targeting system if you decide to use it that way.

Pavel Datsyuk End-to-End Goal: Dissected


Pavel Datsyuk End-to-End Goal: Dissected

In this post we’re dissecting Pavel Datsyuk’s end-to-end goal against Nashville. As great as the individual effort was, there are quite a few team details that really made this play possible.

datsyukIt starts with Datsyuk providing proper support for his defenseman in the defensive zone. He picks up the puck and initiates the breakout to the right winger. After making the breakout pass, he follows up the play, providing mid-lane support on the breakout. As the breakout is happening, the weak-side winger blows out of the zone, pushing the opposing defenseman back, which opens up space for Datsyuk to wheel. The play finishes with the opposing defenseman reaching for the puck, and Datsyuk eats him alive.

Great individual effort, made possible by well-structured positional play.

Hope this helps!

How to Beat a 1-2-2 Forecheck


How to Beat a 1-2-2 Forecheck

I’ve had a few questions come in recently on the 1-2-2 Forecheck. Specifically, coaches are looking for ways to beat it. The 1-2-2 is a great forecheck, but, as is the case with any system, it’s beatable. Your objective is to control the puck, drawing players out of position, then beating them with a pass. Here are the key points:

How to Beat a 1-2-2 Forecheck - YouTubeHow to Beat the 1-2-2 Forecheck
1. Defenseman carries the puck to open ice
2. Defenseman walks the puck until someone comes to get him (if nobody comes, he walks all the way down the ice!)
3. As soon as F2 or F3 leaves their coverage to attack the Defenseman, he or she moves the puck to that side of the ice, hitting the now-open player with the pass
4. At this point you’ve got two players beat, and you’re walking out of the zone in an odd-man rush

Q&A on the 2-3 Press Forecheck


How to Convert the 2-3 Press into Offense after the Transition

I recently received a question on the 2-3 Press Forecheck. The question looked like this:

Jeremy,

How do you transition from forecheck to offense when you create a turnover in the 2-3 press? It seems tough to run a cycle because you will draw players out of good defensive position.

Nick

I decided to answer it in a post, rather than to try to explain it via email or blog comment. Here’s a quick summary of how it works:

2-3_pressHow to Convert the 2-3 Press into Offense after the Transition
1. F1 Drives deep and hits the puck-carrying defenseman
2. F2 Reads the play, and supports F1
3. F3 sets up on the blue line, between the two defensemen
4. If F1 or F2 cause the turnover, and pick up the puck down low, slide immediately into the cycle, with F3 dropping into the high slot
5. If the turnover happens up top, or in the middle, whoever picks it up steps into the slot and shoots.

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