Winnipeg Jets Power Play: Dissected


Winnipeg Jets Power Play Dissection from the Illegal Curve show on TSN Radio 1290 in Winnipeg

This past Saturday I had the opportunity to be a guest again on the Illegal Curve show on TSN Radio 1290 in Winnipeg. If you haven’t listened to the show before, and you’re a Jets fan, check it out here: http://illegalcurve.com/

The topic I covered on Saturday will be useful to any coach, whether you’re a Jets fan or not. I also made a video dissection of the Jets power play after the fact, illustrating a few of the things I mentioned on the show. So, Check out my segment in the audio below, then watch the vid!

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Here are the key points as discussed on the show:

  1. Not getting a lot of power plays in the first place (especially last week)
    1. Only two against Boston
    2. Only one against Buffalo
    3. Against the Rangers and Devils they started using their speed, and Drew more penalties those game
  2. Puck movement is pretty good once they actually get the set-up
  3. Problems with breakout and moving through the neutral zone
    1. Forcing passes to covered players in NZ (in my opinion, it’s ok for the defenseman to carry it all the way on a PP if the other team lets him walk)
    2. Against Rangers and Devils, they improved on this a lot – and were able to get the puck deep and set up
    3. Not driving deep enough
  4. Problems with the initial attack
    1. taking the shot before getting the set up (I usually say don’t shoot on the initial attack on a PP unless you have a 2 on 1 or better, because if you miss, you’re not in position to rebound and the other team can ice it and waste time)
    2. Forcing passes – the whole idea of the PP is to isolate a man, then beat him with a pass. If you pass too soon, or force a pass, you’re not going to open up opportunities
    3. They never really got the set-up in last week’s games‚Ķ this week was better on that front.
  5. Against the Rangers & Devils they started fixing these problems
    1. Used speed more to draw penalties
    2. Didn’t force passes in the neutral zone (defenseman started walking it more)
    3. Drove the puck deep then looked for the set up, or sometimes dumped it in to the open man
    4. Great puck movement within the zone
    5. Still not pulling the trigger enough, and getting sticks on rebounds
  6. MY SUGGESTIONS: Assuming they continue to improve on the breakout and puck movement through the NZ, and assuming their puck movement on the set-up stays solid like it was this past week, my main observation would be that the men in front might be a little too low. There are two approaches to screening a goalie, both have pros and cons:
    1. Right on top of him – better screen, more annoying, but tips don’t have as much room to change the trajectory of the shot, and rebounds usually bounce past you (which happens a lot to the Jets)
    2. Further out (7 or 8 feet in front of the goalie) – not as good for screens, not as annoying/distracting for the goalie, but much more effective for tips, and way better for jumping on rebounds

Full Speed Power Play Passing Sequence



Full Speed Power Play Passing Sequence

I use the Full Speed Power Play Passing Sequence to simulate the patterns and passing lanes players will see in game situations. The idea for this drill is to instill the mindset of “Set-up, Attack, Rebound, then back to Set-up.” All executed at top speed. Here’s the diagram and explanation:

Full Speed Power Play Passing Sequence

1. Player’s line up in proper position for your team’s power play set-up (in this case it’s the “hybrid” set-up)
2. Place cones in positions where the opposing defenders will likely be
3. Work through your attack options, in order from highest probability to lowest
4. Focus on running through “set-up, attack, rebound, and back to set-up,” with crisp passes, always executing at full speed

Enjoy!


USE THIS DRILL IN YOUR OWN PRACTICE PLAN:



Power Play: Breakout




Here’s one of my favorite power play breakouts…

There are quite a few different power play breakouts. Rather than try to cover them all, I thought I’d just post my favorite. I like this one because it is very versatile, and can beat most penalty kill forechecks if the players read and react effectively.

This is another instance where I like to have designated responsibilities so that we always have the proper-handed-shot in the correct position.

Lastly, I forgot to mention in the video, but SOMETIMES there is an opening straight up the middle to the “breakaway man.” If the far forward notices this, he can cut across the blue line early and sync up with the quarterback behind the net. The QB can step out to the RIGHT side in this example, and fire a hard pass up the middle to that far forward. You can usually get away with this once or twice a game before the other team takes it away.

Enjoy!

Power Play: “Hybrid” Overload/Umbrella




My favorite power play set-up… The “Hybrid”

The “Hybrid” is a very complex power play set-up that has very specific skill requirements for each position. This is a phenomenal set-up IF you have the right personel for the job. If not, it will fall apart badly!

Make sure your players understand the “key indicator” that signals the “shift” (see video for details). Doing this will ensure that the timing works out correctly. Also, I like to designate a specific side of the ice to run it from every time to eliminate positional confusion, and to make sure we have the proper shooting hand in the proper spot.

Enjoy!

Power Play: Umbrella




The Umbrella is a solid power play set-up that can be very difficult to defend against if run well

The Umbrella is a very common power play set-up at higher levels of play. The reason for this is that it is extremely effective when run well. Remember to structure your set-up using players that fit each position’s “job description,” including what way they shoot.

The Umbrella works very well when two cross-ice passes occur before the shot (see video for examples). This helps to hang the goalie out to dry, and can really mess up the opposition’s penalty kill.

Enjoy!

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