X-Tiles Flooring System



The X-Tiles Flooring System Allows you to Build a State of the Art Hockey Training Center, One Piece at a Time!

I was recently introduced to a new hockey dryland tile that I’m really excited about. It’s called the X-Tile, and it’s made by XHockeyProducts (yes, the same company that brought you the X-Passer, and the X-Deviator).

If you’re familiar with XHockeyProducts, you already know they are famous for designing heavy duty, smart, & functional hockey training equipment… and this product is no different!

The X-Tiles are not only an awesome flooring product to give you a slick surface for stickhandling, shooting, and passing, but they’re also a fully integrated, hockey training system that works in tandem with many other products! In this review I’ll be showing you how the X-Tiles work, and sharing my experiences with them.

Unboxing:

My first impression of the X-Tiles was that they are actually a really good weight. You don’t want a product like this to be too flimsy, but at the same time, you don’t want it to be too hard to move around. The X-Tiles are a durable, manageable weight.

Size:

The next thing you’ll notice about the X-Tiles is that they’re huge (2 feet by 2 feet!). I always say “the bigger, the better” when it comes to flooring tiles because you want to have the fewest seems possible.

Assembly:

The X-Tiles are REALLY easy to put together AND take a part. This is a big feature in my opinion because it allows for a degree of portability, and gives you the option to change configurations if you want (a feature I have made use of a few times myself).

The easiest way to put together your X-Tile set-up is to lay it out first to get an idea of where everything is going to sit, then tap it all together with a rubber mallet. In the video above, I put together a 15 tile set-up in about 11 minutes.

Add-ons:

One of the coolest features with the X-Tiles System is that you can add on various pieces of equipment to enhance your experience and work on different skills. Here’s a quick list of add-ons you’ll want to consider:

  1. X-Deviator or X-Deviator Mini – hockey stickhandling aid that can be adjusted into multiple configurations
  2. X-Tiles Passer – bungee rebounder that snaps into the X-Tiles
  3. X-Saucer – awesome device used to work on saucer passes, also built to snap right into your X-Tile set-up
  4. X-Tiles Pocket – a “pocket” piece that is designed to hold the X-Deviator in place. Again, built to snap into your X-Tiles set-up

Experience:

As you can see in the video, using the X-Tiles System is A LOT of fun! The tiles are very slick, the seams are very flat, and the pucks slide well on them. The add-ons work really well, and are fully integrated with the tile system. I like the fact that you can easily change configurations or add to your X-Tiles system over time.

The X-Tiles are also pretty “kid proof.” I’ve had my boys using these things every day, and they’ve held up just fine. My kids love it!

Conclusion:

This is definitely a product I stand behind. If you’ve got it in the budget, I’d pick up a few boxes of X-Tiles right up front, along with all the add-ons (check out the Weiss Tech Hockey Package XHockeyProducts has put together). It’s a fantastic training system that is unlike anything else out there. However, the beautiful thing is that you ARE working with a budget, you can just as easily start basic and then keep adding to it piece by piece as you have the funds.

FAQ on 1-2-2 “Foosball” Forecheck

Make sure you check out the original 1-2-2 “Foosball” Hockey Systems Forecheck post before you watch this.

Since I posted the original 1-2-2 “Foosball” Forecheck video back in October, I’ve had a lot of feedback. Many of you have had a lot of success using this forechecking system… this is great! I am always interested in hearing about your experiences with the drills, systems, and other material I post here.

Over the past few months, there have been a few recurring questions and comments about this particular forecheck. Rather than answering the same questions over and over, I decided to post a video that addresses the three main questions people have asked:

  1. What happens if the defenseman reverses the puck (or beats F1 in some other way)?
  2. How to you convert this forecheck into an offensive attack once the puck is turned over?
  3. After the initial “flush” what does F1 do?

Hopefully this video helps to clear these three issues up. Remember… ANY forecheck is beatable. This one is no different. The idea is to perfect multiple forechecks so that once a team starts keying in on what you’re doing, you can switch it up on them.

Have fun with this, and let me know if you have any additional questions or comments!