MacDonald Forecheck Drill



MacDonald Forecheck Drill

The MacDonald Forecheck is a nice little drill to work on forechecking lanes and angles. Here’s the diagram and explanation:

MacDonald Forecheck Drill

1. On whistle, forecheckers take a lap around the center circle
2. As the forecheckers finish their lap, coach dumps the puck in
3. Forecheckers attack, 5-man unit breaks out
4. After the breakout occurs, puck is passed back to the coach
5. 2 of the 3 forwards peel out to take a lap around the middle circle, becoming the new forecheckers (forwards must communicate who goes!)
6. As forecheckers finish the turn, coach dumps the puck in for a breakout from the far end
7. New 5-man unit moves into the end that just broke out

Enjoy!


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Winnipeg Jets’ Penalty Kill (DISSECTED)



A Detailed Analysis of the Winnipeg Jets’ Penalty Kill Forecheck and Defensive Zone Coverage Setups

In this video we walk through a detailed analysis of the Penalty Kill Systems the Winnipeg Jets are using. Remember, systems play is very subjective – everyone has their own opinions… this is my two cents worth!

Here’s a quick breakdown of what to look for:

FORECHECK:

  • 1-3 Forecheck: F1 tends to commit too early, allowing the Wild defenseman to walk out from behind the net uncontested.
  • F1’s Angle: Breaks my cardinal rule for trap-style forechecks – DON’T GET BEAT BEHIND YOU!
  • NZ Transitions: Jets rely too heavily on picking off passes in the neutral zone, and not enough on solid angling and positioning. This won’t work as well against the better teams.

PK DEFENSIVE ZONE COVERAGE:

  • Triangle +1 against Umbrella: Not a good systems match-up in my opinion. Angles are off, and it allows the opposing team’s “Quarterback” to easily pass to whomever he wants.
  • Standard Box against Overload: Good systems match-up, but the Jets need to tighten up on a few things (see next few points)
  • Weak-side Forward: Tends to over commit, leaving the opposing far defenseman open
  • Net-front Coverage: Jets are letting a player sit right in the middle of their coverage, in front of the net
  • 5 on 3: Too passive (in my opinion)

Cheers!

Jeremy

3 Shooter, Rebound and Recovery



The 3 Shooter, Rebound and Recovery Drill is a great way for players to work on their shots, while goalies work on their movement!

This is a great, simple, goalie drill. It allows your shooters to work on their shots while the goalie works on his/her movement around the crease, angles and rebound recovery. Here’s the diagram and explanation:

3 Shooter, Rebound and Recovery Drill:
1. Goalie in the net, three shooters set up as shown
2. Shooter 1 shoots low glove side. Goalie tries to kick rebound into the corner, then FOLLOWS his rebound and squares up to Shooter 2
3. Shooter 2 shoots anywhere. Goalie makes the save and stays square to the rebound, wherever it goes.
4. Goalie Squares back up to Shooter 1, and this time Shooter 1 shoots low stick side
5. Goalie tries to kick rebound into the other corner, then squares up to Shooter 3.
6. Shooter 3 shoots anywhere. Goalie makes the save, then squares up to the rebound.
7. Drill repeats, with Shooter 1 alternating which side he shoots to.

VARIATIONS:
1. Move the shooters closer or farther away
2. Activate shooters 2 and 3 to play the rebounds if applicable
3. Add a 4th player that passes the puck from the corner to the shooters

Enjoy!


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11 Visual Targets for Hockey Goalies



Use visual targets to help goalies play the angles properly

Angles are, arguably, the most important part of a goaltender’s game. If you cannot manage your angles appropriately, it will be more difficult to make the simple saves. Using these 11 visual cues on the ice will assist goaltenders, at all levels, to manage where they are on the ice.

11_cues

11_cues_seq211 Visual Cues: Sequence 1
1 & 11 – Goal Line
2 & 10 – Board-side Hashmarks
3 & 9 – Defensive Zone Dots
4 & 8 – Blue Line on the Boards
4 & 7 – Neutral Zone Dots
6 – Straight up the Middle

11 Visual Cues: Sequence 2
1. Spray paint lines on the ice that match up with the visual cues
2. Set up pucks further out along the visual cues (spray paint dots to keep the set-up)
3. Players shoot from the spray painted dots, goalie uses spray painted lines to judge angles

Notes:
In this drill I discuss marking the ice using rope and paint. This is not absolutely necessary to work with the visual cues but will help a younger goalie correct his or her position within a practice. After doing this once or twice, you shouldn’t have to do it anymore unless the goaltender continues struggling with angles.

Another good idea is to take video of the goalies telescoping in and out. You can then show them the video so they can see how the angles change while they move in and out at the cue. This will definitively teach them how angles work. All of this seems very simple and basic, yet almost all goalies struggle (even some of the most experienced) with angles at some time in their career. Work on this and you will definitely be a better goalie.

Regards,

Hands


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